Kayak Buying Guide

July 27, 2017

Kayak Buying Guide

Kayaking fishing is starting to get the recognition it deserves, becoming a more popular sport with each passing day. It’s a great way to enjoy the freedoms and adventures on all bodies of water - from rivers to ponds, lakes to oceans. Whether you plan to fish or use it for recreational paddling, you're sure to enjoy being on the water and the ability to go where bigger vessels cannot. The most important thing to do when first starting out is to find the right style kayak for you. There are a couple different types, as well as multiple sizes, colors, and applications, for kayaks out on the market.

The two types of kayak body styles are sit-in and sit-on. It comes down to personal preference as to which type is better for you, but you may want to consider what you plan on doing with your kayak first. Sit-in kayaks are mainly used for recreational paddling, but they can also be set up and used for fishing. The advantages to having a sit-in kayak are they typically weigh less than sit-ons, they cut through the water a little easier, and they can be maneuvered a bit easier. A huge disadvantage is that sit-ins can be a little more difficult to get back into if you happen to flip your kayak. Also, sit-ins are not always the most stable compared to sit-ons.

Sit-on kayaks are primarily used for fishing applications. The advantages of going with this style are that they can be accessorized more since there is more surface area. This means anglers can mount rod holders, fish finders, tracks, and other accessories easily. Sit-on kayaks are also wider than most sit-ins, making them more stable. Sit-ons usually offer more storage depending on the layout of the kayak. You would be able to enter, exit and reboard a sit-on kayak easier since there is no cockpit like you would have in a sit-in kayak. The biggest disadvantage of a sit-on kayak is that they typically weigh more when compared to sit-in kayaks. Also, you tend to get a little wetter while using sit-on kayaks as you are exposed to the elements, unlike the sit-in style which protects your body's lower half.

Between the two styles, there are several advantages and disadvantages. While you may have already made the decision to take up kayak fishing, it’s now up to you to decide on a style. Check out FishUSA’s selection of angling kayaks and accessories today to help start (or grow) your kayak fishing gear!

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